I have been trying to write a killer blog post for ages – and failing. So, to oil the ‘ol creative wheels, I’ve decided to deconstruct the idea of “writing”, followed by, “killer”. And “blog”.

What am I writing? A blog.
Who am I writing it for? My business plan says, “Business women over 35.” However, as soon as I wrote the plan it went out of date.

Bugger.

Like most bloggers though, I’ve read many posts advising us all to speak with our own voice and clearly picture who we’re talking to. The mirror? Friends? Family? A business colleague?

Here’s a couple of articles I’ve read lately http://www.freelancefactfile.com/how-to-pinpoint-your-ideal-client/ and http://www.enchantingmarketing.com/voice-in-writing/ really hitting home the idea of investing effort in writing a business plan. There’s plenty of ideas to be getting on with (I live in Yorkshire and will occasionally slip into a regional accent).

Which brings us back to ‘writing a killer blog’. How about just writing a blog. We’ll come back to “killer” when we never make mistakes (I’m not holding my breath. You?)

Well, as my business plan shows, we can’t develop hard and fast rules about who we’re talking to online, when we really just need to talk to people. That’s what social media is about – talking to people. I’m one. You’re one. So are our friends, family and business colleagues.

Next, ‘tone of voice’. Although we’re all just talking to people, are we talking to them from where we are now? Or where we were ten or twenty years ago? Are we talking as ourselves or who we want to be? This is an incredibly important distinction, and one it has taken me YEARS to be clear about.

To illustrate this, I went to a family reunion a few months ago. It was great fun, but the host treated us as though we were still in our twenties (which is how old we all were when we last got together). Was our host thinking he was still in his twenties or we were still in ours? It wasn’t wrong, just odd. So, we need to be clear about who we are and who we’re talking to – or we’ll give the impression of being …just odd.

See? I’m only thinking of you.

Advertisements